Category: History

Arab Intellectual Hisham Sharabi, 77, Dies

Hisham Sharabi, 77, a prominent Palestinian American intellectual and activist who co-founded the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University, died of cancer Jan. 13 at American University of Beirut Hospital. For the past four decades, Dr. Sharabi championed the cause of Palestinians and consistently advocated for women’s rights in the Arab world. In …

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In Memoriam: Dr. Hisham B. Sharabi

The History Department is saddened to announce the passing of our colleague, Prof. Hisham B. Sharabi. Dr. Sharabi, Professor Emeritus of History and Umar al-Mukhtar Chair of Arab Culture, passed away on January 13, 2005, at the American University of Beirut Hospital. A specialist in European intellectual history and social thought, Dr. Sharabi was also …

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My arranged marriage disaster

  Zarghuna Kargar. Photograph: Frank Baron for the Guardian   It was while recording a story about the impossibility of divorce for women in Afghanistan that Zarghuna Kargar decided she must find the strength to end her own arranged marriage. Brought up in Kabul and then Pakistan after her family fled from the Taliban, she …

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The secret art of Beryl Bainbridge

  Beryl Bainbridge at her home with one of her paintings. Photograph: Adrian Dennis/Rex Features   Beryl Bainbridge‘s daughter, Jojo Davies, is lifting one painting after another outside into her back garden so they can be photographed in a clear light. The paintings are by her mother. Beryl Bainbridge died of cancer on 2 July …

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Why don’t we love our intellectuals?

  Cafe society: Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir in Paris, 1940. Photograph: Sipa Press / Rex Features   One of the distinctive aspects of British culture is that the word “intellectual” seems to be regarded as a term of abuse. WH Auden summed it up neatly when he wrote: “To the man-in-the-street, who, I’m …

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Love in literature

‘Love-language has been pulled differently in different eras between the great generalising symbols – the heart, the rose, the fixed star.’ Photograph: Bob Thomas/Popperfoto/Getty Images   At matins on 6 April 1327, in the church of St Clare in Avignon, Francesco Petrarch may or may not have seen Laura for the first time: her skin …

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